Monday, 28 March 2016

Rudolf Haym on Hegel

Rudolf Haym (1821-1901)

This post summarizes the illuminating introduction by Pierre Osmo to his French translation of politician and Hegel scholar Rudolf Haym's famous biography and commentary Hegel and his Time (1857).

Friday, 5 February 2016

A Meeting with Hegel in 1826

Unter den Linden, Berlin, 1826, by Johann Wilhelm Brücke.

The following is an extract from the diary of a future Scottish church minister David Aitken in 1826, during a visit to Germany in which he visited Hegel in Berlin.

Neo-hegelianism in Germany before 1945 (Part Three)


This post completes our summary of the Introduction to Sylvie Hürstel's Au Nom de Hegel (2010) on German juridical neo-hegelianism, with some selections from her conclusion.

Sunday, 18 October 2015

Neo-hegelianism in Germany before 1945 (Part Two)

We continue our series of posts based on French scholar Sylvie Hürstel's Au Nom de Hegel (2010) on juridical neo-hegelianism in Germany before 1945. Here we locate the idea of a "Hegel-renaissance" as a potential successor to the Neo-Kantian movement.

Sunday, 11 October 2015

Neo-hegelianism in Germany before 1945 (Part One)


This begins a series of posts based on French scholar Sylvie Hürstel's important book Au Nom de Hegel (2010) that addresses the use of Hegelian ideas in German legal circles during the Weimar Republic and Third Reich. To the best of my knowledge, this marks a very significant advance in scholarship on the reception of Hegelian ideas in Germany during a critical era. This particular post concerns her contextualizing introduction.

Sunday, 30 August 2015

From Mylne to Hegel (Part Two)


This post completes our two-part essay tracing the early reception of Hegel in Britain back to the influence of James Mylne.

Sunday, 16 August 2015

From Mylne to Hegel (Part One)


This post examines the reception of Hegel in 19th century Britain, leading up to The Secret of Hegel (1865) by James Hutchison Stirling, the "father of British Hegelianism". I trace the striking Scottish receptiveness to Hegelian ideas back to James Mylne's rationalist critique of the "moral sense" and "common sense" schools of philosophy in Glasgow.